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Undergraduate Program

Dr. Gould class

Dr. Marty Gould's 19th-Century British Literature class

The Department of English offers degree programs and general education courses in Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Professional Writing, Rhetoric & Technology. The Literary Studies program of study provides students with a knowledge of literary method, literary history, and a broad range of literary accomplishment (including knowledge of emerging fields, world literatures, and ethnic literatures). Creative Writing is designed for aspiring writers of fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction. Professional Writing, Rhetoric & Technology provides students with both a practical and a theoretical orientation to communication in a variety of media and genres. While students in the English Education program take courses offered through the Department of English, that program is administered by the College of Education.

Undergraduate Research Opportunities

The Office of Undergraduate Research sponsors up to two research awards for outstanding research completed by students in English. Recipients must be English majors conducting research within the discipline, apply to present their research at the Undergraduate Research Colloquium, and be directed by a member of the faculty (the faculty mentor will need to provide a letter of support to accompany the nomination form). More information on the awards, including eligibility and nomination and submission instructions, is available here. Students are encouraged to nominate themselves for the award. The deadline for submission is March 1, 2013.

Undergraduate Journals

Thread logo

http://english.usf.edu/thread/

Thread is an online journal edited annually by English majors, where some of the best current USF undergraduate writing (literary criticism and research; creative writing; and in the future, technical writing) can glow on the screen instead of festering on the hard drives of its creators.


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